Why you should skip the tourist bar and head straight for a peña instead

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Trad play

After a night out in a pretty nondescript club where the only thing unusual was a stabbing on the dance floor, I was more than happy to sample something a little more… more typically Bolivian, I guess.

My friend Max suggested a peña. ‘It’s a place for traditional music’, he said. Did I fancy it? Sure! Of course! Something different, something local. Finally.

Me and a little posse of travellers made our way along a side street in La Paz and down some stairs into the belly of a building where musicians sang and played woodwind and percussion whilst groups of friends clustered around tables, chatting, drinking and welcoming in a Friday night.

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Candlelit moodiness and music

Ojo de Agua didn’t fit with Frommer’s comments about peñas tending to be very touristy. We were pretty much the only tourists in there, and it was obvious. So we split up and mixed and merged.

By candlelight I drank te con te, a hot alcoholic drink, and chatted and danced with locals. Pan pipes, accelerating beats and spinning around and around after too many shots of warm, alcoholic tea made me deliciously dizzy.

As the music wound down, we all climbed back up and out of this high ceilinged, lightly populated dance hall and back into the cold, cold chill of La Paz. Early evening fumes had lifted and the streets were surprisingly quiet for a city on the brink of a wild weekend.

The evening finished further away from the centre in a softly lit bar bursting with Bolivians and the smell of cigarette smoke and rising heat from a huddled collective of bodies. People bent in to hear near whispers, orders were murmured at the bar. A man perched on a stool crooned away, finishing songs with a dramatic burst of strummed chords, claps and whoops exploding after the final slap.

I may have missed out on the salt flats eco rave but this low-key night out was a cosy little moment in the great city of La Paz and a lovely little reintroduction to a social drink and dance after far too long on antibiotics.

As the only tourists in both places, it was also a teeny taste of the real La Paz.

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3 Comments

Filed under bolivia, culture, dancing, food & drink, music, south america

3 responses to “Why you should skip the tourist bar and head straight for a peña instead

  1. beautifulrisks

    Hi Finola, I hope you are enjoying your travels. I have tagged you in the game of Blog Tag so your readers can learn a little bit more about you. There is no pressure to participate, here are the rules. Hope you are well. http://beautifulrisks.wordpress.com/2012/08/04/blog-tag/

    • Thanks for involving me in this game, Sara, I will definitely get around to answering the questions and tagging a new lot of bloggers. I will mull over your questions which definitely need more than a yes/no answer! I love reading your blog posts – always thoughtful and beautiful – and I’m glad you swing by my blog every now and then.

  2. Pingback: Being a bad tourist in La Paz | travelola

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